Venus of Laussel

The Venus of Laussel is an 18.11-inch high limestone bas-relief of a nude female figure, painted with red ochre. It was carved into a large block of fallen limestone in a rock shelter (abri de Lausselfr:Abri de Cap Blanc) in the commune of Marquay, in the Dordogne department of south-western France. The carving is associated with the Gravettian Upper Paleolithic culture (approximately twenty-five millennia old).  Alexander Marshack said about the Venus of Laussel that "One cannot conjecture on the basis of one engraved sequence any meaning to the marks, but that the unusually clean horn was notated with storied marks is clear.

Wikipedia: Venus of Laussel
Donsmaps: The Venus of Laussel - La Femme à la Corne

More details

25 000 ~

  • Europe
  • Gravettian
  • 42 cm

Homer.  Hymn XXX

To Earth the Mother of All

I will sing of well-founded Earth, mother of all, eldest of all beings.
She feeds all creatures that are in the world,
all that go upon the goodly land,
and all that are in the paths of the seas,
and all that fly: all these are fed of her store.
Through you, O queen,
men are blessed in their children and blessed in their harvests,
and to you it belongs to give means of life to mortal men and to take it away.
Happy is the man whom you delight to honor!
He has all things abundantly: his fruitful land is laden with corn,
his pastures are covered  with cattle, and his house is filled with good things.
Such men rule orderly in their cities of fair women:
great riches and wealth follow them:
their sons exult with ever-fresh delight,
and their daughters in flower-laden bands play and skip merrily over the soft flowers of the field.
Thus is it with those whom you honor O holy goddess, bountiful spirit.
Hail, Mother of the gods, wife of starry Heaven;
freely bestow upon me for this my song substance that cheers the heart!
And now I will remember you and another song also.

English Translation by Hugh G. Evelyn-White. Homeric Hymns. Cambridge, MA.,Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1914.

Reviews

Write a review

Venus of Laussel

Venus of Laussel

The Venus of Laussel is an 18.11-inch high limestone bas-relief of a nude female figure, painted with red ochre. It was carved into a large block of fallen limestone in a rock shelter (abri de Lausselfr:Abri de Cap Blanc) in the commune of Marquay, in the Dordogne department of south-western France. The carving is associated with the Gravettian Upper Paleolithic culture (approximately twenty-five millennia old).  Alexander Marshack said about the Venus of Laussel that "One cannot conjecture on the basis of one engraved sequence any meaning to the marks, but that the unusually clean horn was notated with storied marks is clear.

Wikipedia: Venus of Laussel
Donsmaps: The Venus of Laussel - La Femme à la Corne