Upper Paleolithic There are 29 items.

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Showing 1 - 12 of 29 items
  • The Löwenmensch figurine or Lion man of the Hohlenstein Stadel is a very early prehistoric sculpture that was discovered in the Hohlenstein-Stadel, a German cave in 1939. The lion-headed figurine, alternately called (by its German names) Löwenmensch (lion-human) and Löwenfrau (lion-woman), is an ivory sculpture that is both the oldest known zoomorphic...

    40 000 ~
  • Gorham's Cave is a natural sea cave in the British Overseas Territory of Gibraltar, considered to be one of the last known habitations of the Neanderthals in Europe. A symbolic rock engraving was found in the cave during July 2012. An international team of researchers carrying out excavations in the cave uncovered a series of criss-crossing lines covering...

    39 000 ~
  • he Venus of Hohle Fels (also known as the Venus of Schelklingen; in German variously Venus vom Hohlen Fels, vom Hohle Fels; Venus von Schelklingen) is an Upper Paleolithic figurine of a woman hewn from the ivory of a mammoth tusk that was found in 2008 near Schelklingen, Germany. It is dated to between 35,000 and 40,000 years ago, belonging to the early...

    37 500 ~
  • The Chauvet-Pont-d'Arc Cave in the Ardèche department of southern France is a cave that contains the earliest known and best preserved figurative cave paintings in the world, as well as other evidence of Upper Paleolithic life. Hundreds of animal paintings have been catalogued, depicting at least 13 different species, including some rarely or never found...

    31 000 ~
  • The Venus of Galgenberg is a Venus figurine of the Aurignacian. It was discovered in 1988 close to Stratzing, Austria, not far from the site of the Venus of Willendorf. The figurine measures 7.2 cm in height and weighs 10 g. It is sculptured from green Serpentine rock. Wikipedia: Venus of GalgenbergDonsmaps: The Galgenberg Venus - Fanny

    30 000 ~
  • The Venus of Dolní Věstonice (Czech: Věstonická Venuše) is a Venus figurine, a ceramic statuette of a nude female figure dated to 29,000–25,000 BCE (Gravettian industry), which was found at the Paleolithic site Dolní Věstonice. This figurine, together with a few others from nearby locations, is the oldest known ceramic article in the world. The statuette...

    27 000 ~
  • The Apollo 11 Cave is an archeological site in the ǁKaras Region of south-western Namibia. Cave was given its name by German archaeologist Wolfgang Erich Wendt who was working in the cave when he heard of the Apollo 11 crew's successful return to Earth on July 24, 1969. The cave contained some of the oldest pieces of mobile art ever discovered in southern...

    27 000 ~
  • The Venus of Willendorf, now known in academia as the Woman of Willendorf, is a 11.1-centimetre (4.4 in) high statuette of a female figure. It was found in 1908 at a paleolithic site near Willendorf, a village in Lower Austria. It is carved from an oolitic limestone that is not local to the area, and tinted with red ochre. The purpose of the carving is...

    26 500 ~
  • The Venus of Laussel is an 18.11-inch high limestone bas-relief of a nude female figure, painted with red ochre. It was carved into a large block of fallen limestone in a rock shelter (abri de Lausselfr:Abri de Cap Blanc) in the commune of Marquay, in the Dordogne department of south-western France. The carving is associated with the Gravettian Upper...

    25 000 ~
  • The Venus of Lespugue is a Venus figurine, a statuette of a nude female figure of the Gravettian. It was discovered in 1922 in the Rideaux cave of Lespugue (Haute-Garonne) in the foothills of the Pyrenees by René de Saint-Périer. Approximately 6 inches (150 mm) tall, it is carved from tusk ivory, and was damaged during excavation. According to textile...

    25 000 ~
  • The Venus of Brassempouy (French: la Dame de Brassempouy, meaning "Lady of Brassempouy", or Dame à la Capuche, "Lady with the Hood") is a fragmentary ivory figurine. It was discovered in a cave at Brassempouy, France in 1892. About 25,000 years old, it is one of the earliest known realistic representations of a human face. The Venus of Brassempouy was...

    25 000 ~
  • The Venus of Petřkovice (Czech: Petřkovická venuše or Landecká venuše) is a pre-historic Venus figurine, a mineral statuette of a nude female figure. It was found within the current city limits of Ostrava (Ostrava-Petřkovice), Silesia, in the Czech Republic, by archaeologist Bohuslav Klima on 14 July 1953. It was beneath a mammoth molar at an ancient...

    23 000 ~
Showing 1 - 12 of 29 items